Thursday, July 29, 2010

Winners of Bangkok IndieFest's 'Golden Shirt' Award to be Determined by Audience Choice

Winners of Bangkok IndieFest's 'Golden Shirt' Award to be Determined by Audience Choice

Winners of Bangkok IndieFest's 'Golden Shirt' award in each category to be determined by audience choice this year, via ballot selection for each of the 80+ participating films.

*YOU* can help determine the winners!

See complete schedule and lineup here:

http://www.bangkokfest.com/schedule_venues/schedule_venues.html

BANGKOK INDIEFEST 1.0: August 6-8, 2553

More info @ aahttp://www.bangkokfest.com/

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Friday, July 23, 2010

LOST IN NEW MEXICO rises above the indie pack!

LOST IN NEW MEXICO rises above the indie pack!

Award winning writer-director J Rosette's 2nd feature, LOST IN NEW MEXICO: the Strange Tale of Susan Hero (www.lostinnewmexicomovie.com) continues to garner more positive press, rising above the Indie Pack.

"It would be interesting to see Rosette’s obvious abilities supported by a professional cast and crew and studio-grade equipment." - The Moving Arts Journal

"Recommended for Adventurous Viewers" - Lib. Journal

"It’s the sort of film that would probably be a sleeper hit if it had the money behind it." - Rogue Cinema

LOST IN NEW MEXICO: the Strange Tale of Susan Hero...the first dramatic feature from the director of the award winning feature docu, BOOKWARS ("Terrific" - LA Times).

His 3rd feature, FREEDOM DEAL, is the never-before told dramatization of the US incursion into Cambodia in 1970 as part of the wider VN-US conflict. 

** The director has spent over half a decade living and working in Cambodia, researching material related to this little known and mysterious episode in US-Asian history **

Contact:  CAMERADO / camerado@camerado.com / www.camerado.com   for inquiries about all our projects!

LOST IN NEW MEXICO: the Strange Tale of Susan Hero (http://www.lostinnewmexicomovie.com)

====================================>>>>

LOST IN NEW MEXICO: The Strange Tale of Susan Hero (2009)

By Eric M. Armstrong, The Moving Arts Journal

Jason Rosette’s no-budget tale of desolation, desperation and loss subtly weaves together the disparate lives of a group of struggling Southwesterners in “Lost in New Mexico.”

Susan (Drea Pressley), grieving and aimless after the loss of her newborn daughter, thoughtlessly seeks out a rogue animal-cloning geneticist (Dr. Alan Rice) to reverse, or subvert, the most inevitable of human events — death.  Along the way she encounters mysterious illegal immigrant, Javier (Jaime Estrada), and the two run away from their respective troubles together, forging an unlikely friendship of circumstance and innate understanding.

Running parallel to this central storyline is a tandem of narratives: one, following a down-on-his-luck Native American pottery artist (David Paytiamo) scrambling to find money to send his daughter to college, and the other, a hapless FDA agent (Jason Rosette) tracking down the clone-doctor to break up his illegal operation.

The narratives are eventually entwined quite nicely, although the characters aren’t necessarily aware when this happens, which makes it all the better.

Rosette’s direction is mostly adept.  He employs a number of small touches that bring the film’s mise-en-scène to life. The Southwestern setting properly reflects the desolation and intense desire to seek, which drives virtually every character in the film.

The script is surprisingly consistent, with incrementally more substantial setups and payoffs plotted steadily throughout the unfolding story making it clear that a lot of care was taken in the writing process.

Although the setting couldn’t be more apt for the players and their stories, the visual composition is noticeably lackluster.  This is understandable and quite common in micro-budget films, but minor adjustments in color correction, framing and maybe even different shutter speed, lens filter and video rendering choices may have increased the film’s overall visual appeal.

Sub-professional equipment can also artificially diminish an actor’s performance, which may have been the case here. No one stood out as particularly magnetic, though no one was bad enough to the point of distraction either. It would be interesting to see Rosette’s obvious abilities supported by a professional cast and crew and studio-grade equipment.

The hook of “Lost in New Mexico” is its human cloning element and the ethical questions that very real dilemma raises. While controversial issues like this are certainly compelling, the film really shines when it explores the emotional implications of such drastic thinking. 

”Lost in New Mexico” wisely steers clear of the minutiae of genetics and cloning, using that hook as nothing more than a portal into the intimate and heartbreaking sphere of a mother’s loss. Everything else is merely ancillary to that central internal conflict. And though it could have used some minor tweaking, “Lost in New Mexico” is a unique and interesting take on the fluidity of technology versus the recurring commonality of the human condition.

 

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Monday, July 05, 2010

New Review for 'Lost in New Mexico: the strange tale of Susan Hero' from Moving Arts Jnl

Lost in New Mexico: The Strange Tale of Susan Hero (2007)

ByEric M. Armstrong -- Published on Jul 4th, 2010 and filed under Film Reviews, Indie. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry


Jason Rosette’s no-budget tale of desolation, desperation and loss subtly weaves together the disparate lives of a group of struggling Southwesterners in “Lost in New Mexico.”

Susan (Drea Pressley), grieving and aimless after the loss of her newborn daughter, thoughtlessly seeks out a rogue animal-cloning geneticist (Dr. Alan Rice) to reverse, or subvert, the most inevitable of human events — death.  Along the way she encounters mysterious illegal immigrant, Javier (Jaime Estrada), and the two run away from their respective troubles together, forging an unlikely friendship of circumstance and innate understanding.

Running parallel to this central storyline is a tandem of narratives: one, following a down-on-his-luck Native American pottery artist (David Paytiamo) scrambling to find money to send his daughter to college, and the other, a hapless FDA agent (Jason Rosette) tracking down the clone-doctor to break up his illegal operation.

The narratives are eventually entwined quite nicely, although the characters aren’t necessarily aware when this happens, which makes it all the better.

Rosette’s direction is mostly adept.  He employs a number of small touches that bring the film’s mise-en-scène to life. The Southwestern setting properly reflects the desolation and intense desire to seek, which drives virtually every character in the film.

The script is surprisingly consistent, with incrementally more substantial setups and payoffs plotted steadily throughout the unfolding story making it clear that a lot of care was taken in the writing process.

Although the setting couldn’t be more apt for the players and their stories, the visual composition is noticeably lackluster.  This is understandable and quite common in micro-budget films, but minor adjustments in color correction, framing and maybe even different shutter speed, lens filter and video rendering choices may have increased the film’s overall visual appeal.

Sub-professional equipment can also artificially diminish an actor’s performance, which may have been the case here. No one stood out as particularly magnetic, though no one was bad enough to the point of distraction either. It would be interesting to see Rosette’s obvious abilities supported by a professional cast and crew and studio-grade equipment.

The hook of “Lost in New Mexico” is its human cloning element and the ethical questions that very real dilemma raises. While controversial issues like this are certainly compelling, the film really shines when it explores the emotional implications of such drastic thinking.  ”Lost in New Mexico” wisely steers clear of the minutiae of genetics and cloning, using that hook as nothing more than a portal into the intimate and heartbreaking sphere of a mother’s loss. Everything else is merely ancillary to that central internal conflict. And though it could have used some minor tweaking, “Lost in New Mexico” is a unique and interesting take on the fluidity of technology versus the recurring commonality of the human condition.

Posted via email from Camerado @ Posterous

Friday, July 02, 2010

Lineup Announced for BANGKOK INDIEFEST 1.0 (2010/2553) Edition

Selections for BANGKOK INDIEFEST 1.0

(Detailed schedule and film info to be posted @ www.bangkokfest.com shortly)

www.bangkokfest.com
Note: Schedule TBA; additional films may be added August 6-8 2553 BANGKOK, Thailand

 

10 Years to Nashville

Katarzyna Trzaska 
34 & Park Cameron Pearson
Amexica Ron Krauss
Born to Be Alive Alexander Felsing & Tobias Sparrman
Broken Christian Doran
Bye Bye Now! Ross Whitaker, Aideen O'Sullivan
Case Closed Kevin Stocklin
Correspondence Oliver Waghorn
Coup De Grace Thymaya Payne
Cravings Andreas Lindergard
Das Paket Marco Gadge
Dental Breakdown Ian Power
D'entre les morts (Among the Dead) Alain BASSO
Die Entbehrlichen (The Dispensables) Andreas Arnstedt
Die Seilbahn (the Cable Car) Claudius Gentinetta
Dieu est Americain (God is American) Richard MARTIN-JORDAN
Dominoes and checkers competition Alexander Gornovsky
Door to Door Ida Akesson
Dried Up Isaiah Powers
Drown Nottapon Boonprakob
EAST PLANET Hiroshi Toda
Eulogy Ben Claremont
Everything Is As It Should Be Jennifer Ruff
Father returning home Imaad Shah
Flip Peter Allen
Go For It DEJAN AĆIMOVIĆ
Insurgency of Ambition Anya Belkina
Intersection (Thai Version) Jae Woe  Kim
It Shines And Shakes And Laughs Matthew Wade
Kamikire Ichimai Momi Yamashita
Keeping Them Safe Lauren  Sandler
LA GLACIÈRE ROUGE Michel Jr Tremblay
La Lampadina Thai Pradithkesorn
Last Night Ed Park
Le prix à payer (The Price to Pay) Paul Gayard
L'Empire des enfants, une femme de Dakar en colère (The Children's Empire, an angry Dakar woman) Gerard Moreau
les intestins de la terre Barbier Olivier
Little Jijar Gun Sangkaew 
LIMINAL Stephen Keep Mills
Lollipop Man Nils Gaard
Lya Nicolas Siegenthaler
Make Me John Ma
Mannen med kulorna (the Man with all the Marbles) Hans Montelius
Massacrator Pierre Ayotte
Meltdown in Tibet Michael Buckley
Mørke Sjeler César Ducasse
Mu -emptiness- RIA AMA
MUGS Ronnie Cramer
My Asian Heart David Bradbury
Nobody's Business Tyler Savage
North Horizon Thomas Freundlich & Valtteri Raekallio
Parking Space David Bitton
Pedaço de Papel (Piece of Paper) Cesar Raphael
Peel Douglas Williams
Puffer Girl Joan Gratz
Retour au pays des ames (Return to the Land of the Souls) Jordi Esteva
Return To Gaza Michael Weatherhead
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Undead Jordan Galland
Run Granny Run Nikolaus von Uthmann
Scissu Tom Bewilogua
Sombras Oriol Canals
Sometimes I Dream of Reindeer Tom Feiler
Song of the River Krissada Tipchaimeta
Souvenirs Andy Pearson 
star, dust Karen Hanson
Staubkaskade Stefan Pautze
Storm'n the Castle Chris Timmons
Suck 3/2 Seed Siwawut Sewatanon
Sweet Crude Sandy Cioffi
Takeo Omar Samad
Televisnu Prithi Gowda
The Cockerels Egg Peter Allen
The Hirosaki Players Jeff Sousa
The Last Elephants in Thailand Donald Tayloe
The Magnitude of the Continental Divides Christopher Coleman
The Marina Experiment Marina Lutz
THE MOVING TOWN Alberto Nacci
The Package Oliver Waghorn
The Quackening Norm Fassbender
Vitruvius' Toybox Dennis Iannuzzi
Wet Nana Dreamscape Jimmie Wing
Why Do You Have A Beard? Paul O Donoghue
World Vote Now Joel B. Marsden
Zwischen Licht und Schatten Fabian Giessler

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